How to Use the Myers-Briggs (MBTI) Personality Test

Having trouble with someone at work? Working on a team that’s not working well together? Check out one of our most popular modules: how to use the Myers-Briggs (or MBTI) personality test to understand diverse personality types.

The MBTI test is used as a formal exercise to diagnose, understand, and better work with people with different personality preferences and ways of perceiving the world. It’s based on the psychological theories of Carl Jung and is used by 89% of Fortune 100 companies to promote a healthy approach to working with people who are unique and have different ways of interacting in the world.

You also have access to a great free tool as a gift from our team at Eazl–a step-by-step guide to using the MBTI exercise at work. Get that download here.
Subscribe to Eazl here

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

From Forbes: Never Give Up Your Salary Details

salary

“It is wonderful to see job-seekers waking up to realize they have more power in the hiring equation than they thought they did.

Employers can’t grow their businesses without great employees on board.

Job-seekers need to know that there are lots of badly-managed organizations that treat job-seekers like dirt. Almost everyone has run into one of those organizations at some point.

The faster you run away from organizations (and recruiters) who treat you badly, the sooner you’ll find the right people to collaborate with!

Don’t give up your current or past salary details just because someone asks you to. What you get paid now and what you got paid at every job you’ve ever held is your personal information — and nobody else’s business.

Recruiters will ask for your salary history and so will employers. If you run into the question ‘What did your past jobs pay?’ on an online job application, here’s how to handle it.”

readfullpost

Three Ways to Build a More Supportive Family and Friend Network

You might like Eazl’s new course on giving great feedback. Here’s a link that will save you $5.

When you’re trying to launch something new, it’s critical to get some early momentum. Many of us hope that our family and friends will be the first people to support our work and if they don’t it can be hard. Recently, I launched a campaign to raise awareness about how we can use new laws to shift more than 1% (the current percentage) of the United States’ $1.4tn of personal savings to local communities (find out more at www.thebigdeal.us).

The campaign is making steady progress but I’ve been disappointed with the support I’ve received from some of the people in my close personal network. Part of that is my fault and in this Brain Boost, I’ve shared 3 recipes that have helped our family network learn to be more supportive of one another. I thought I’d share them with you.

Strategy #1: Build the habit of celebrating small wins. You can find Harvard’s research behind this here.

Strategy #2: Teach your family and friends how to use social media well. Specifically, using hashtags and profile tagging will make their social media support much more effective.

Strategy #3: Build a culture that supports progress. When you’re doing something that will take a while to build, you need people to help you stay focused by reminding you of your progress. You should do the same for them.

Have you had an experience when your family and friends network didn’t support you?

Subscribe to Eazl here

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

New Course Published: The Essentials of Giving and Receiving Feedback

Learn How to Give Constructive Feedback, Build Effective Teams, and Continuously Improve

*Get $5 off the course*

In this course, you’ll develop communication skills, learn specific feedback methods, and see examples of leading group meetings, giving performance reviews, giving real-time constructive feedback, creating a collaborative team culture, and implementing systems that lead to continuous performance improvements.
• Learn to Be a Better Leader with Great Feedback Skills
• How to build trust and between people in a professional setting
• Communication skills for giving effective feedback
• Specific feedback methods and examples of them in action
• Building towards continuous feedback culture (e.g. people operations and analytics)

Master One of the Most Important Skills for Great Managers and Founders
Your ability to give, receive, and use feedback is one of the most critical skills in business and in life–and that’s borne out by research. According to research published in the Harvard Business Review in 2016, internal trust is the #1 predictor of team effectiveness. This course on feedback and team communication is relevant to all professionals–for senior managers, shift leaders, new team members, startup teams, and freelancers.

Communication Can Only Create Positive Change If It’s Done Well
Ideal for a professionals in all industries, organizational structures and sizes, and geographies, in this course you’ll learn how to build trust, how to work with a variety of personalities, how the world’s leading companies attract and retain top talent, when and how to use information that you’re receiving in the form of feedback, and a lot more.

This interactive training series starts with a section on building trust within teams, offering specific, actionable strategies that you can start using right away. This section includes a variety of tools–from formal psychology analyses to fun, collaborative games taught at comedy schools to foster on-stage communication. You’ll learn what these tools are, how to use them, why to use them, and specific step-by-step methods for building team trust.

In section two, you’ll learn communication skills that will help you, your team, and/or your partners and clients exchange feedback to improve outcomes. You’ll learn what good feedback looks and sounds like, what growth-oriented communications are, how to solicit feedback, and how to steer conversations so that you can be a stronger leader or manager. These communication skills are 100% necessary if productive feedback is going to be possible.

In section three you’ll learn specific forms of feedback e.g. how to use group feedback sessions effectively, how to use digital mediums (e.g. messaging apps or email) for feedback, how to be a good coach or mentor, how to lead performance reviews and performance improvement talks, and more. You’ll get specific step-by-step methods for implementing these strategies so that you’re supported with an easy-to-follow structure as you build your skills in this area.

Then, in section four, you’ll see the feedback methods you’ve learned put into action with examples and role-playing exercises performed on screen. This will enable you to see what you’ve learned in action so that you have a learning reference available to you any time you need it.

In the final section, you’ll learn the foundational principles of people operations and people analytics. You’ll start to build your knowledge of continuous feedback methodologies which have proven to be the most effective and rapid prescription for improving performance in a fast-changing world. These methodologies are being used at top firms like Google, Proctor and Gamble, and others.

Subscribe to Eazl

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

How men can support women going through burnout

This post is an excerpt from an original post by Sam Cherubin. 

eazl-sam-cherubin

A Conversation with Samantha Keen

What is burnout?

First of all, I want to define burnout from my own experience as a practitioner. I work on the level of subtle bodies, or the non-physical level of the human condition. This includes the body of vitality or life-force, and consciousness or the spiritual dimension.

When a person has burnout:

  • they’re deeply exhausted
  • they feel cynical
  • they don’t believe they can make any difference

In this experience, in their body of energy, there’s a very deep depletion that needs to be addressed first. But this exhaustion is more than something a weekend in bed can fix. The depletion comes from being emotionally overstimulated for a long time. Think of nurses in an Emergency Room – they push themselves to do things they didn’t want to do or their body wasn’t ready for.

After a long time of going against your own internal rhythms and needs the result is potentially a deep level of energy depletion. At this level of exhaustion, there’s a disconnection from the body of life-force, and consequently, desires and wantings. So, the person is both deeply drained, and they’re not connected to themselves, at a source level.

This is why meditation-based therapies like the ones that I practice can be so beneficial, because they facilitate both a re-connection, and also a boost to the life force.

Burnout was first defined by Freudenberger in 1974, but more recently, Dr Christina Maslach Ph.D has been leading the research. She’s at UC Berkeley, just around the corner from where I live.

She defines burnout as a psychological syndrome involving:

  • Emotional exhaustion (feelings of being emotionally overextended and exhausted by one’s work)
  • Depersonalization (unfeeling and impersonal response toward recipients of one’s service, care treatment, or instruction)
  • A diminished sense of personal accomplishment (feelings of incompetence and failure in one’s work)”

To continue reading the article and learn more about how to support women experiencing burnout , click the image below:

sam cherubin

 

Is Marijuana Good for Your Brain?

Is Marijuana Good for Your Brain?
New evidence shows that low doses weed might reverse the symptoms of aging in older brains. Exposure to THC might help older brains learn more easily and prevent memory loss. Andreas Zimmer from the University of Bonn in Germany says that after many repetitions of the experiment, his research team is seeing a “very robust and profound effect” of THC reversing the signs of aging in the older brains of mice.

The Experiment
Zimmer’s team gave young, middle-aged, and elderly mice a dose of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, over the course of a month. After a month, the team tested the mice’s ability to perform tasks like finding their way around mazes and recognizing other mice. There were two primary findings to these experiments:

1. Young mice who weren’t given any THC tended to perform better than middle and older-aged mice who also hadn’t gotten THC

2. Middle-aged and older mice’s performance improved significantly when exposed to consistent small doses of THC over the previous month.

Stronger Case for Weed
The University of Vermont notes that in 2016, legal marijuana sales hit $6.7bn in the United States. By 2020, they expect that the market for legal marijuana in the US will grow to $22bn –larger than the amount of money generated by the National Football League. With increasing evidence that there are wide opportunities for the use of marijuana for natural health, the legal marijuana industry might be one of the breakout industries of this generation.

Further reading:
Chronic Low Doses of THC Restores Cognitive Function in Older Mice
Follow Dr. David Nutt, Chair of the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs on Twitter
University of Vermont’s Report on the Legal Marijuana Industry in 2016

Subscribe to Eazl here

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Are We Living in a Simulation?

Elon Musk and Y Combinator’s Sam Altman have now publicly said in recent days that there is a strong possibility that we’re all living in a simulation. Are we? Is this the Matrix?

The Case for It
Though this idea was floated as early as the 17th century, it was popularized again in 2003 by Nick Bostrom, the founder of the Future of Humanity institute at Oxford University in the UK. It basically goes like this:
1. In the future, it is inevitable that human civilization will have enormous computing power
2. This computing power will surely be strong enough to run simulations to understand how their ancestors (us) thought, behaved, and evolved.
3. There is a strong chance that humankind will not self-destruct in the future
4. There is a strong chance that if future humans have the power to run simulations, they will run them.
5. Therefore, there is a strong chance that we are now in one of those simulations.

The Case Against It
People like MIT professor of physics Max Tegmark believes that, while there’s a chance that we’re in a simulation, it’s a slim one. His argument against this idea goes like this:
1. The laws of physics show evidence of ever-increasing complexity
2. Those laws would need to be mastered in order to run a simulation good enough for today’s smartest humans not to find flaws in the simulation.
3. We do not observe such flaws in the laws of nature, therefor it is unlikely that we are in a simulation.

Here are some fun links related to this subject
• Follow the Future of Humanity Institute on Twitter 
MIT Prof. Max Tegmark on Twitter
Y Combinator discussion of this topic
• Nick Bostrom’s 2003 paper on why we are likely to be in a simulation

Subscribe to Eazl here

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

The Basics of Mutual Funds for Beginners

*Get more useful information and tools in our Personal Finance online training ($5 off)

Learn what a mutual fund is and the essential vocabulary around dealing with them.

This video is Part 3 of a three-part series.

View part 1, The Basics of Stocks for Beginners

Vies part 2, The Basics of Bonds for Beginners

Subscribe to Eazl here

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

The Basics of Bonds for Beginners

Learn what a bond is and the essential vocabulary around dealing with bonds. This is part two of a three-part series. Subscribe to Eazl here to get notified when the final part of this free series is published.

Check out the first part of the series, The Basics of Stocks for Beginners.

Get more useful information and tools in our Personal Finance online training ($5 off).

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook: http://facebook.com/eazl.co
Twitter: http://twitter.com/eazltweets
Instagram: http://instagram.com/eazl.co

The Basics of Stocks for Beginners

In this video, learn about asset classes, price vs. value, capital gains, and more. This is one of a three-part series. Look for our other videos on bonds and mutual funds later this week! Subscribe to Eazl on YouTube to get notified when they are published.

*Get more useful information and tools like this in our Personal Finance online training ($5 off)

Interact with the Eazl community:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram