How to Use Intro Chats in Personal Networking

You can learn more about this topic in Eazl’s new Instant Skills course on personal networking.

When you’re building a personal network, “intro chats” are a great way to meet new people without committing too much. In this Brain Boost see how we use the PIG (Preferences, Interests, Goals) system to qualify people who we might collaborate with, hire, or buy something from.

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New Eazl Course: 5-Step Roadmap to Making a Great Hire

You can find the full Recruiting, Interviewing, & Hiring in 60 Minutes here.

Your 5-Step Roadmap to Making a Great Hire:
• Lead the hiring process for your company or team
• Write compelling job descriptions that attract candidates
• Source candidates from referral networks and the general public
• Proactively recruit using advanced LinkedIn® search tools
• Perform phone screens and interviews with candidates
• Structure compensation agreements with new hires
• Manage the decision-making process and extend job offer

What drives the performance of most companies? Great people. While professionals at many levels of seniority and across many geographies will benefit from this course, some audiences that will likely find immediate applications for these skills are:
• Recruiters and HR professionals looking to make great hires
• Team leaders who need to recruit or filter through internal candidate applications
• Entrepreneurs or business owners responsible for managing their own hiring process

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New Eazl Course: Professional Networking Strategy

You can find the full Personal Networking course here.

Learn how to make professional connections, filter out mis-aligned people, and start relationships with future partners.

Learn the CCMM Professional Networking Strategy in Less than 90 Minutes:
• Develop connections with professionals who can make a difference in your career
• Converse with new connections to determine alignment (or lack thereof)
• Craft approaches to developing new relationships with well-aligned people
• Expand your professional network through 2nd degree connections

To learn more about new courses launching this month, visit this page: http://eazlblog.com/new-courses-fall-2017/

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Finding Mastery Podcast

This is a guest post from Eazl community member Amanda Rose. Connect with her on LinkedIn by clicking the image below.

Amanda Rose Eazl

On my daily excursions with my best friend, Tumbles, I play a game with myself. While she’s smelling bushes and gopher holes, I examine the houses on our route. As we pass each house, I question myself about the family inside, and I wonder about how they achieved suburban splendor. “What do they do for a living? How did they achieve their goals? What did they overcome? Was it a sink or swim situation? Were they a child prodigy?” Some of the questions I ask myself might seem silly, but it’s a direct reflection on my personal desire for progress. I project that these people have found their purpose, something I have yet to do for myself.

These seemingly successful people are all around me, and often times, all around us. It’s not easy to strike up a conversation with a total stranger, especially if you’re hoping to glean some insight about yourself from them and their story. That’s why the podcast movement is so important for young professionals like myself – phenomenal interviewers can delve into the minds and lives of highly successful people, and we get to eavesdrop. The Finding Mastery Podcast is currently one of my favorites.

Finding Mastery Podcast Eazl

Finding Mastery makes titans of athletics, business, and art accessible to the public. The host, Dr. Michael Gervais, is a high-performance psychologist who, over the course of each episode, examines and dissects the guest’s journey through life and the struggles they’ve faced, the guest’s psychological framework and how they interact with the world, and the mental skills and values necessary to become successful in intense, performance driven environments. Hearing wildly successful professionals discuss their own hurdles and shortcomings is both comforting and inspiring, and I can better see how my path is developing by learning from the experience of others.

dr. michael gervais eazl

Michael is a wonderful interviewer. His experience working in high stakes environments gives him the insights necessary to provide a space where his guests can open up and share personal anecdotes of failure and triumph. These honest conversations are the key to what make the podcast great. Michael believes, and I agree, that these honest conversations are important as “informal education” – lessons learned outside of a classroom and through experience. I have no interest in a glossy puff-piece on someone’s success. I’m a work-in-progress, and knowing that my situation isn’t unique, helps motivate me to keep improving and striving for greatness.

Guests on the Finding Mastery Podcast include world record holding athletes, gold medallists, CEOs, head coaches, and more. There really is an interview here for everyone. However, the most impactful guest for me has been Amy Hood, CFO for Microsoft.

Amy’s leading position in a global corporation is hard for me to imagine in my current stage of life, but the challenges, motivations, and self-descriptors that she and Michael identify during the interview resonate deeply with me.

Eazl Amy Hood Microsoft

Amy remarked that she’s viewed as intense, “bitchy” as she jokes in the interview, and that her self-worth has always been determined by performance output. She lived in fear of failure and was very hard on herself when she didn’t succeed as she intended. Most notably for me, she mentions that she can be unintentionally intimidating because she thinks quickly and speaks with confidence in front of others. As a woman, I know this behavior is often misinterpreted or dismissed. I also think and speak quickly and with confidence when I’m problem-solving with a group, and I have personally felt members of the group disengage out of intimidation. Michael and Amy discuss her moments of self-realization and the tools she uses to “round the edges”, so she can communicate more effectively, as well as how she shifted her perception from “perfection” to “progression”.

Amy speaks on how these lessons helped her create an inclusive corporate culture – one that didn’t promote the radical pressure that she unnecessarily placed on herself for so long. I was excited by her passion for providing her coworkers a sense of belonging. Shifting her own mentality, as well as her coworkers’, has encouraged much more success and growth in the company. Her episode is a must-listen, and I was literally vibrating with inspiration afterward.

An informal education strengthens a formal education, and I highly recommend the Finding Mastery Podcast as a means for rounding out your experience and finding inspiration. Dr. Michael Gervais provides a space for some of the most successful people in the world to share their tips, tricks, and techniques for mastery with me and you. The variety of industry, experience, race, gender, and creed is astounding, and I’m sure you’ll find multiple people whose stories resonate with you and encourage you to seek mastery for yourself. Now when I’m out with Tumbles, I’ll think to myself, “I create my own purpose. I’ve got this.” And so do you!

Finding Mastery also has a closed Facebook group with an engaging community looking to help anyone along their current journey and you can follow their Facebook Business page here.

From Harvard Business Review: Playing Office Politics Without Selling Your Soul

playing office politics

“Unsurprisingly, research shows that when employees perceive their workplace as more political, they are less engaged, less productive, and more likely to quit. And yet, a more effective way of dealing with office politics is to engage in them — playing the game, instead of complaining about it. Fortunately, not all politics are bad, and there’s a way to play the game without selling your soul.”

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From Forbes: Never Give Up Your Salary Details — Do This, Instead

eazl never give salary details

“It is wonderful to see job-seekers waking up to realize they have more power in the hiring equation than they thought they did.

Employers can’t grow their businesses without great employees on board.

Job-seekers need to know that there are lots of badly-managed organizations that treat job-seekers like dirt. Almost everyone has run into one of those organizations at some point.

The faster you run away from organizations (and recruiters) who treat you badly, the sooner you’ll find the right people to collaborate with!”

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Certificates, Nanodegrees, and the Future of Work

This post is part of our Augment Your Resume series. We’re creating content that will help you upgrade the language, certifications, volunteerism, and projects sections of your resume.

How will certificates, nanodegrees, and badges fit in to the #FutureOfWork? 🤔

Thought Point #1: Decentralized Authority
Everything is trending towards decentralization. We’re seeing small-scale, decentralized energy production, cryptocurrencies and blockchain are decentralizing finance, and globally distributed and globally connected workforces are an example of decentralized production.

Similarly, authority is now becoming decentralized. Here’s an example: today, one of the most respected degrees in artificial intelligence is the Udacity Nanodegree and Udacity is an organization that was launched 5 years ago.

As technology continues to disrupt and force people to re-learn skills, new kinds of educational credits are emerging because we need them. They are certificates, nanodegrees, and badges.

Thought Point #2: The Decline of Loyalty at Companies
Research shows that companies are increasingly disloyal to their employees and that employees are increasingly disengaged from the companies they work for. (For example, see Harvard’s http://hbs.me/2xwSUIC)

In his 2017 book “The End of Loyalty,” Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Rick Wartzman shows that, starting in the 1980s, companies that were already healthy started using layoffs to increase shareholder profits, causing a total destruction of trust between shareholders and the C-suite and employees. (See http://whr.tn/2w1m0Si)

Instead, we’re seeing an overwhelming preference for people to earn their wages from freelance, consulting, and small team arrangements rather than working for large organizations (see Eazl’s recent update on freelancing in the US at http://bit.ly/2w2nQ5p).

In arrangements like this, there is usually no internal training staff, so you have to bring your own skills to work.

What’s New? Eazl Certificates
Enter certificates, badges, and nanodegrees. While they probably won’t replace a traditional bachelor’s degree any time soon, they’re going to play a more important role in demonstrating to clients and partners that you are capable of something.

Recently, Eazl published the Facebook Ads Certification Course and the certificate we’ve designed is meant to give you a tool that you can use to close more deals, demonstrate your skills, and increase the attractiveness of your LinkedIn profile and resume because we’re here to be your partner in success. You can see John’s Facebook Ads certificate at http://bit.ly/johncert.

If you’ve completed 100% of our Facebook Ads Certification Course (see http://bit.ly/fbads10) or or Essentials of Feedback and Performance Management (see http://bit.ly/youtubefb5) course, you can request your certificate at http://bit.ly/eazlcertified and we’ll make one just like John’s for you.

Onward… to the future!

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Why You Should Leverage Volunteer Work on Your Resume

This post is part of our Augment Your Resume series. We’re creating content that will help you upgrade the language, certifications, volunteerism, and projects sections of your resume.

How to Leverage Volunteer Work on Your Resume

A lot of candidates assume volunteerism is a cheesy and disingenuous addition for a resume that only recent grads and students need.

Maybe you have a similar experience to my own senior year of high school when everyone volunteered at Habitat for Humanity and we all arrived to discover we had no skills to offer, taking turns hammering one nail each or unnecessarily holding a ladder for stability on flat, level ground.

Because a lot of us have had experiences with these not-so-meaningful volunteerism efforts that our parents and teachers told us we must have to get into a good school, we’ve come to think they aren’t important -not only for our resumes but for our communities as well.

It’s simply not true!

Check out some of the reasons to invest in your Volunteerism section on your resume below and head on over to our Career Hacking course to learn the best way to format and present your experiences with our side-by-side videos.

It Gives You an Edge
A lot of employers are specifically looking for candidates with a history of volunteerism and see volunteering as a sign of leadership. Resumes that include a volunteerism section have an edge over other applicants (1).

Since a lot of applicants are thinking it doesn’t matter if they volunteer, that means there is a shortage of applicants that do include these experiences on their resume. Why wouldn’t you want to set yourself apart from the crowd?

It’s Good for More Than Just Your Current Job Search
If you choose your volunteer roles strategically and do something related to your field, you can grow your personal network and create more career opportunities for yourself (2). Volunteering is a great way to meet people and start relationships off on a positive note. You never know when you might meet someone who knows someone…you know?

It Carries More Cred Than You Would Think
Almost half of hiring managers interviewed view volunteer work as equivalent to full-time work experience (3). That’s a serious stat right there!

If you focus on finding a volunteer role that enables you to use your skills, you’ll reap multiple benefits for your do-gooding.

It Gives You the Best Excuse
Volunteering is also a great way to fill employment gaps (4).

When I was living in Sonoma County and new to the area, I needed a way to show that I was professionally active until I could bring on some clients for my freelance marketing practice. I was in the midst of meetings and building my network, but I needed something in between to build my profile and possible connect me to companies in the area.

That’s when I discovered a children’s educational content nonprofit and volunteered to create a social media strategy for them. The founder tried her best to connect me with other people in the area as well.  I ended up volunteering my time to the organization for a couple of years and enjoyed every minute of it. I was actually sad when I became busy with Eazl and needed to part ways with them.

You can’t add volunteer experience retroactively, but remember this next time you’re in-between jobs or clients.

It Build Your References
You can use the people you volunteer for (and with) as references (4), as I mentioned in my previous point. Think about it: some of the nicest and most caring people volunteer in their free time. If you’re genuine, add value, and are kind to others in the organization, you’ll create relationships with people who will support you.

How to Add Volunteer Work to Your Resume

how to leverage volunteer experience on a resume
To create this graphic, we used helpful information from (5).

You might also find these additional resources helpful:
Handling Employment Gaps on Your Resume
How to Use the Template if You Have No Work Experience
Using the VISTA Career Planning Tool
Writing Great Resume Content for a Volunteer Position
Resources
(1) Here’s Why Your Should Put Volunteer Work on Your Resume
(2) 5 ways volunteering can help you find a job and advance your career
(3) 4 Ways Volunteering Can Help You Find a Job
(4) Why Volunteering is a Smart Career Strategy – And 6 Ways to Get Started
(5) Leverage Volunteer Work on Your Resume

6 Project Ideas for Your Resume

This post is part of our Augment Your Resume series. We’re creating content that will help you upgrade the language, certifications, volunteerism, and projects sections of your resume.

project ideas resume

The Projects section might be at the bottom of your resume…but don’t be fooled! It’s still a major selling point of your CV and is becoming more and more relevant in the modern job market as companies look for employees who self-train and walk through the door with something to offer on the first day.

This is why lifelong learning and continuing education is having a moment right now…and the market will continue to grow.

There are a lot of ways that you can demonstrate your initiative and interests as projects on your resume. Here are a few ideas…

  1. Start Your Own Blog
    It doesn’t have to be a huge commitment and you don’t need hundreds of blogs posts to exhibit expertise within your field.

Begin by making a list of topics that someone with your job title would be expected to be knowledgeable on and develop your post ideas from there.  One post per topic will work.

The Big 6 Skills on your resume is a good place to start. We teach you how to determine your Big 6 Skills in our Career Hacking Masterclass.

Make your posts unique by showing your personality and giving a real look into your work history and interests. A generic blog might hurt you instead of help you.

Since the sole purpose of your blog is to demonstrate your skills to potential employers, you can skip worrying about social media integration, SEO, and other typical website concerns. Keep in mind that someone who has already seen your resume or LinkedIn profile is going to be looking at your blog.

You’ll be driving traffic there directly so you don’t need to focus on any of the “pull” mechanisms of marketing.

What you should focus on is uniqueness and quality of writing. If you’ve never blogged before, take a look at some blog posts for ideas on how to structure them. Find a talented writer to edit before publishing if writing isn’t in your skill set.

If you’re better at being on camera than you are writing, make the content video-based.

You’ll also need to focus on making the blog attractive because studies have shown that people ultimately judge that content of a site based on its appearance.

  1. Make Something
    Is there some way you can bring your skills and interests into the physical world?

For those already who are already “makers” by trade or product-centric, this will be easy, but there are opportunities for desk workers as well.

Let me use myself as an example. Most of my work experience is related to marketing and operations, most recently in the educational content world, and my next career move is to focus more on content within the consumer behavior, business ethics, and psychology of happiness realms. If I were to make a career move in that direction through traditional employment, I would probably put together something like a book or magazine that contains content on one of these topics. I would maybe even bring in a couple of people to work on this with me so we can all use it on our resumes.

You don’t have to use an expensive printing solution either. In fact, you could skip printing altogether because you’ll be linking the pdf version on your resume.

Your project will have to make sense for your role and industry, but get creative and find something you’ll enjoy working on. If you need help with ideas, Tweet at me and we’ll chat about it.

  1. Team Up
    A big selling point for employers is an applicant who demonstrates an ability to thrive as a part of a team. There are some exceptions, of course, but most of us have to work with others in some way or another.

eazl teamwork

Think of ways you can team up with someone to work on industry research, something creative, etc.

Demonstrating teamwork through a project is especially a good idea if you are wanting to move into a role that will require teamwork but have mostly solo work in your work history.

4. School Projects
Especially if you are a recent grad, the projects you completed during your studies can be included in the Projects section of your resume. Try to include only the most relevant projects you worked on -you don’t want this to be a list of every paper you wrote all throughout college.

What projects have the most crossover with the work you would performing if hired?

5. Start a Meetup Group
Meetup group leadership will show employers that you are a person who will take initiative to create something useful for others.

eazl meetup group

It will also brand you as a person who is interested in people, which is actually really hard to come by these days.

As a bonus, you’ll also meet lots of new and interesting people who have connections to companies and jobs and build your social and organization skills.

6. Play Pretend
Create a make-believe work scenario and assign yourself a project that will demonstrate the skills that you would be performing if someone hired you.

In my early days of digital marketing, I would created logos, websites, and marketing strategies for pretend companies so I could show potential clients what my work looks like in addition to the work for clients I already had.

This is also helpful if you are looking to change industries but use the same skill set.

Have something in mind that I’ve forgotten here? Comment below and let’s talk about it!