View from the C-Suite: Levers of Influence

🌱 This interview with Brian Burwell, the CEO of a major management consulting firm, is one of a series that compliments Eazl’s Advanced Management Training program. For students enrolled in the course, each one of these interviews aligns with a section of your learning experience. 🌱

This is Part 3 of a 6-part interview. View the rest of the series here:
Part 1:  Talent Development
Part 2: Productivity, Passion, & Focus

If you are interested in enrolling in the course, you can get 70% off of the retail price using this link 👉 http://bit.ly/eazlamt20


Notes from the interview:

  • When you need to make a recommendation, your style tends to be more linear.
  • It’s really important to understand where the audience is coming from in terms of how they process information.
  • When you’re informally advocating, you should be listening a lot more than talking.
  • When you are advocating, and you’re doing the talking, you are failing.
  • The most effective negotiations and advocates of a point ask a lot of questions.
  • You’re not going to get someone to change their mind in a single conversation.

 

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From Fast Company: How to Write Emails That Don’t Make People Silently Resent You

negativity bias email

“Research has shown that when we receive an email, we’re predisposed to view the tone of that message negatively–or at least more negatively than the sender intended it.

Given that everyone has this natural “negativity bias” against email, it’s important to pay close attention to your phrasing. For the most part, we use email either to remind people about things they said they’d do, or to ask them to do something for us. In the absence of social cues, this is a delicate task. With that in mind, here are a few tips for making your emails friendly and appealing—without running on too long or coming off as ingratiating.”

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View from the C-Suite: Productivity, Passion, and Focus

🌱 This interview with Brian Burwell, the CEO of a major management consulting firm, is one of a series that compliments Eazl’s Advanced Management Training program.

For students enrolled in the course, each one of these interviews aligns with a section of your learning experience. 🌱

This is part two of a 6-part interview. View part one on talent development here.
Notes from the interview:
  • One way to determine your focus is your passion for that particular thing.
  • You also have to follow your brain. You have to have the skill-set to be successful in that particular field.
  • You have to find where your energy comes from.
  • It’s very frustrating to have a passion and a set of skills and apply it to business where you can’t make money.
  • Think about: Is this a business where you can make money if you are good at it?
  • Brian has seen two general approaches to productivity: the “full monty” model and the “highly discriminatory” model
  • The highly discriminatory model: “I’m only going to do things that I’m uniquely qualified to do. I’m going to avoid things that are energy zappers.”
  • When you say “no” remember: There might be other people who enjoy doing those things.
  • You have to understand your biorhythms.

If you are interested in enrolling in the course, you can get 70% off of the retail price using this link 👉 http://bit.ly/eazlamt20

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The 3 Pillars of Hiring Employees

This video is an excerpt from our Learn Recruiting, Interviewing, & Hiring in 60 Minutes (Certificate Course). Get $10 of the course with this link: http://bit.ly/YTPRO10.

Video Summary:
* Hiring is a process that involves many people. Look to find the best fit and create lots of choices for potential hires
* The hiring process is a funnel. By the end, you should have 2-3 good candidates to choose from
* Look to build trust by being transparent and communicative
*Discrimination is illegal

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View from the C-Suite: Brian Burwell on Talent Development

🌱 This interview with Brian Burwell, the CEO of a major management consulting firm, is one of a series that compliments Eazl’s Advanced Management Training program. For students enrolled in the course, each one of these interviews aligns with a section of your learning experience. 🌱

This is part one of a 6-part interview. Look for the additional footage over the next several weeks. Subscribe to get notified.

If you are interested in enrolling in the course, you can get 70% off of the retail price using this link 👉 http://bit.ly/eazlamt20

Key takeaways:

  • It’s equally important to develop employees’ talents as it is to find talented people.
  • The #1 quality a CEO needs to be successful is determination. If you don’t have that, you are going to fold.
  • Mindset is just as important as intellectual capability.
  • Find talent that has enough of a skill-set for you to work with.
  • You create safe spaces by the capabilities you help people develop and the situations you put them in.
  • As a leader, it’s part of your job to help people become fully developed human beings.

 

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NEW! Advanced Management Training 5.0 (Course Trailer)

This is the trailer for the new update of out Advanced Management Training program. You can claim a $10 coupon at this link: http://bit.ly/AMT-YT10.

This is an MBA in a box! You’ll learn hiring, mentorship, communication & persuasion, productivity hacks, negotiation & leadership skills, + more.

Course Description:
Similar to MIT’s Advanced Management Program for high potential managers (which costs $57,000), this course will develop a comprehensive suite of skills that you need in order to be a manager that delivers exceptional value to your team, organization, and the communities you serve.

*Learn recipes for handling common management challenges
*Communicate and persuade in the age of digital communication
*Win in negotiations while cultivating long-term relationships
*Maximize your personal productivity and handle time constraints
*Understand issues faced by managers from a macroeconomic perspective
*Transform your leadership style and develop your soft skills

New Eazl Course: 5-Step Roadmap to Making a Great Hire

You can find the full Recruiting, Interviewing, & Hiring in 60 Minutes here.

Your 5-Step Roadmap to Making a Great Hire:
• Lead the hiring process for your company or team
• Write compelling job descriptions that attract candidates
• Source candidates from referral networks and the general public
• Proactively recruit using advanced LinkedIn® search tools
• Perform phone screens and interviews with candidates
• Structure compensation agreements with new hires
• Manage the decision-making process and extend job offer

What drives the performance of most companies? Great people. While professionals at many levels of seniority and across many geographies will benefit from this course, some audiences that will likely find immediate applications for these skills are:
• Recruiters and HR professionals looking to make great hires
• Team leaders who need to recruit or filter through internal candidate applications
• Entrepreneurs or business owners responsible for managing their own hiring process

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Community & Team Building Tips from Stranger Things 2

Spoiler alert: If you haven’t watched it yet and plan on doing so, you might not want to continue reading just in case. I don’t want to be responsible for ruining your experience with that magical show.

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As I, like so many other Netflix users, marathoned Stranger Things 2 over the weekend, I began to take note of the numerous examples of collaboration and community throughout the series. This show is seriously Lord-of-the-Rings-level life goals for friendship and working to achieve a giant goal.

The characters on Stranger Things accomplish amazing, superhuman feats together and I love that the general storyline has followed a pattern of personal responsibility through teamwork vs. individualism.   

I mean, what better way is there to take on a supernatural force from a another dimension than with all hands on deck and collective use of force and problem solving; a perfect combination of brains and brawn where all members contribute what they do best?

There’s a lot to be learned from these fictional characters as they possess qualities that humans admire in real life but may not experience first-hand that often.

You don’t have to be up against a shadow monster from Upside Down to reap the benefits from collaboration and community building.

Try applying some of these lessons from the series to your own work and career goals:

  1. Bravery is required for anything meaningful
    Steve Harrington and Chief Jim Hopper were two of the series’ most physically brave characters in Season 1 and they maintain their fearlessness in Stranger Things 2, with the former utilizing his bat with nails a second time and the latter venturing underground to see first hand what the monster is up to.
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Steve and Dustin prepare to take on the Pollywog.
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Chief Jim Hopper explores the monster’s underground tunnels.

Nancy doesn’t hesitate to expose the government’s role in Barb’s death or snatch up a shotgun to take on the demidogs.

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Nancy and Jonathan wait for Barb’s mom at the park as part of their plan to expose the research facility.

Winona Ryder’s character Joyce Byers, the mother of Will (the boy once abducted by the monster in Upside Down and now returned home), displays great mental and emotional strength and bravery when she “exorcises” the monster from her son’s body.

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Joyce builds the fire to “burn” the monster out of her son, Will.

People tend to think that those who demonstrate bravery are somehow endowed with special characteristics or attributes but we are all actually capable of courageous acts. We just have to make the choice to be brave.

Check out The Heroic Imagination Project by Dr. Philip Zimbardo, famed director of the Stanford Prison Experiment.

What brave and courageous moves can you make in your career, your daily actions, and your personal life? What ideas and movements can you boldly support for the greater good?

  1. Have a clear mission
    In Stranger Things 2, there are multiple groups working parallel in order to achieve the goal of finding out how to get rid of the monster. Eventually, at the end of the season, they come together and fight alongside each other only to divide and conquer once again.

You never really see a group conflict and members naturally assume their roles based on their talents. In this series, any time a character is told they should stay behind and keep themselves safe, they pretty much never listen. Even the kids!

No one is willing to put themselves ahead of the group. Everyone contributes and understands the mission, which is what makes achieving the mission possible.

Note the Rule of Law established by Will’s friends: when someone needs help, they show up and help.

Will’s friends, Dustin and Mike help strategize.

It’s easier for a group of people to work together when there is a clear mission. That’s why it’s important to ensure that the mission gets buy-in from all team members, perhaps by setting some kind of Rule of Law at the start of the engagement or project.

Remember this when you work in team, whether you are the leader or not. You can always lead by example even if you don’t have formal power within a team by showing that you are committed to the mission.

  1. Pyramid structures don’t work
    Pyramid structures are rarely if ever truly effective. This kind of structure implies that there are just a few people giving orders and many acting on those order, regardless of what their own expertise and intuition tells them is the right course of action.

There is no centralized authority deciding how to take on the monster…and that’s what makes taking on the monster possible.

Steve, Dustin, and Lucas join Nancy and Jonathan at the research facility just before they provide a getaway car for Joyce, Mike, and Chief Hopper.

Different characters have different perspectives and there are multiple problems to solve, making those individual perspectives highly valuable.

From Dustin’s creative and playful imagination developed through role playing games and Bob’s coding skills to Steve’s experience with sports teams and Chief Hopper’s familiarity with approaching dangerous situations, everyone has something they can offer and adhering to centralized leadership would squash that.

When you create your teams for work and projects, remember that your co-workers can thrive without a single manager of leader. Organic organization is powerful.

  1. Focusing on community is the biggest middle finger to “the man”
    The government as the enemy isn’t just a cheesy throwback theme that was most often seen in 80s sci-fi movies. There is meaning behind this theme and the reason we are attracted to themes like these is because they hold a lot of truth in them.

Government and military are responsible for opening the gate between reality and Upside Down, along with all of the destructions caused by it. There’s that centralized authority again.

The community coming together was the only thing that could balance out the power and limit the destruction, including getting the gate between worlds closed.

You too can organize something that has impact and counterbalances the “powers that be”. You just have to build the community, no matter the scale.

  1. Be a doer
    Chief Hopper never hesitates to jump to action, whether it’s belaying into a super creepy and perilous underground tunnel or setting up formation to shoot up some demidogs.

Nancy follows her intuition to do the right thing and expose the research facility.

Steve doesn’t need to weigh his options when asked for help.

There are a lot of people in the world who spend a lot of time talking about problems but they never do anything to help solve those problems. Don’t be one of those. How can you contribute? What problem can you help solve? What community can you bring together in collective power?